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WEEDS

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Goats On The Go affiliates throughout the U.S. use goats to control nuisance and invasive vegetation on residential and public properties.
Each year, Hubbard County has a few more places where these unwanted invaders are identified, according to Greg Hensel, Hubbard County Parks and Recreation supervisor and agricultural inspector.
The state of Minnesota has launched an advertising campaign designed to inform livestock producers of the dangers of purchasing sunflower screenings, non-certified hay and other feeds from out-of-state, including North Dakota, because of the Palmer amaranth threat. State officials say the concerns are particularly strong at the Red River border between Minnesota and North Dakota, where several counties have Palmer amaranth infestations. The danger is particularly acute for the sugarbeet crop, which has few chemical tools to fight it.
Gardening columnist Don Kinzler says the products that aid in controlling weeds can also cause unintended harm — sometimes putting the user in legal jeopardy.
Gardening columnist Don Kinzler offers advice on a squash vine infestation, as well as how to kill creeping Charlie in lawns and ways to prevent green areas on potatoes.
As kids, we spent many summers bumping along the dirt roads in Dad’s pickup as he patrolled creeks and ditches — ever vigilant to any splash of yellow representing leafy spurge. He would screech to a halt and we'd trot to the back of the truck to pull out hoses so we could douse every offending patch with herbicide. These days, we are more prone to limping than trotting. But we're still spraying spurge, Tammy Swift says.

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"Fielding Questions" columnist Don Kinzler also answers questions about spraying newly seeded grass and dealing with quackgrass in raspberries.
"Growing Together" columnist Don Kinzler says different strategies are required to deal with the weeds.
U.S. Customs and Border Protection ag inspection specialists are on duty 24/7 to look for noxious weed seeds and insect pests coming from Canada to the U.S. by rail. The crossing at Portal, North Dakota, is the fifth busiest railyard in the country, when measured by number of containers. The crossing at International Falls, Minnesota, is the busiest.

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