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POLICE VIOLENCE

According to a statement Tuesday the proposal also includes changes in policing to prevent stops like the one that preceded Wright's killing in April 2021.
Jury selection in the case was set to begin June 14. Opening statements were slated for July 5.
By entering the plea on Wednesday, now-former officer Thomas Lane avoided an upcoming trial on the more serious charge of aiding and abetting second-degree murder.
Reuters identified five police trainers whose political commentary on social media has echoed extremist opinions or who have public ties to far-right figures. They work for one or more of 35 firms that advertised at least 10 police or public-safety training sessions in 2021.

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A brief body camera excerpt released by the city after the shooting showed officers opening the door of the apartment where the 22-year-old Locke was staying. Officers did not knock before entering. Seconds later, Locke is seen stirring from underneath a blanket and holding a handgun just before he was shot.
Did the controversial term originate in a missed serial killing? Contested diagnosis is commonly cited in cases of death while in police custody, but a new report says it arose from a failure to spot murders at the hand of a mid-1980s, Miami-based killer of Black women.
The jury's closed-door discussions began shortly before 10 a.m. and ended at 5 p.m. Lunch was provided to them in the deliberation room so they were able to work without a break. The 12-person, all-white panel was expected to return for more discussions at 9 a.m. Thursday.
Attorneys for prosecution, defense deliver closing arguments
Ex-cop Thomas Lane takes the stand in federal civil rights trial; closing arguments Tuesday
The shooting in Brooklyn Center triggered multiple nights of protests in the Minneapolis suburb, capturing national attention at a time many Americans were reckoning with racism and police violence.

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J. Alexander Kueng said he tried to act as a conduit between Chauvin and then-officer Thomas Lane, who asked repeatedly whether George Floyd should be turned on his side. Kueng, though, admitted he never asked Chauvin to turn Floyd over himself but echoed Chauvin’s response to “just leave him.”
No-knock warrants have been under increased scrutiny since the fatal police shooting of Amir Locke earlier this month in Minneapolis.
Kueng, 28, took the stand in St. Paul's federal courthouse Wednesday, speaking publicly for the first time in the trial against him and two other former officers charged with depriving Floyd of his civil rights during the fatal encounter.

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