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TRAILS

Otter Tail County Board officially accepts new name for paved recreational trail that will run 32 miles from Perham to Pelican Rapids
The communication company recently presented a $17,500 donation to the city.
Anyone wanting to get off the beaten path and ride on the many forest trails in the area has many options to choose from.
City officials unveiled 14 new sculptures at Red Bridge Park and downtown Park Rapids.

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The public is invited to a grand opening and tour of the Park Rapids Sculpture Trail at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, May 21, beginning at Red Bridge Park.
"Minnesota's Best Autumn Hikes" details how to get there and what you'll see.
Local officials are asking for another $2.2 million in state bonding money, including $500,000 to carry the trail from Acorn Lake, across a new bike bridge over Becker County Road 10, and along the Highway 10 right-of-way to Highway 87.
“Anywhere there is snow on the ground, trail managers have issues with winter trail etiquette,” one trail manager said.. “We don’t want people's first experience to be associated with rude, disruptive behavior.”
No clear successor has emerged to maintain the humorous collection of signs at Duluth's Piedmont Ski Trail and to replace those that have gone missing.
Friends have been watching Jansen do it, largely unimpeded, for decades — grooming, smoothing out a 35-mile network of trails, up to six hours a day, twice a week, during the highs of summer and during the depths of winter.

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Minnesotans with an all-terrain vehicle registered for private or agricultural use won't need to pay the additional registration fee ($53.50 for three years) to ride the state's public ATV trails, Friday through Sunday, June 7-9.
The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources invites anyone with an interest in recreational trail systems and motorized use in the Huntersville and Lyons state forests in Wadena County to attend a public meeting from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb....
FARGO -- On his recent, grueling journey through the Alaskan bush, Dan Binde ate foods that were low in variety but high in practicality. He lived on ramen noodles, instant potatoes and dehydrated meat that he carried by backpack, stopping at vil...

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