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NORTH DAKOTA

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The potatoes, donated by Northland Potato Growers Association members through a project dubbed Northland Potato Blessing Project, will be used for meals, holiday gift baskets and food boxes during the next year.
In the 1920s, Engolf Snortland started running with a bad crowd, later kidnapped the wrong man, and went to prison. He moved home to North Dakota for a fresh start, only to be shot dead. In the years to come, the fallout from his unusual case would reach the state Supreme Court and inspire groundbreaking legislation in North Dakota.
Iowa-based Summit Carbon Solutions says its $4.5 billion pipeline project will help ethanol plants. The project aims to capture greenhouse gas emissions and pipe the CO2 to western North Dakota for underground storage.
Sanford Health and Minneapolis-based Fairview Health Services are pursuing a merger planned for completion by the end of 2023 that would combine the nation's largest rural health provider with a major Twin Cities health system.
Last winter's uncertainly on fertilizer inputs has subsided somewhat. Flexible or not, any lease is likely to reflect the strong prices for commodities and the demand for cropland.
Jason Schatzke, treasurer of the Red River Valley Sugarbeet Growers Association, died in a car crash Saturday, Nov. 12. The driver of the vehicle, Christopher Thompson, is charged with two felony counts of injury or death resulting from driving under the influence.

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LeRoy and Rosemary Helbling of Mandan, North Dakota, farm with International Harvester equipment that is mostly 30 to 40 years old, kept in pristine condition. They raise crops primarily as feed for their Hereford herd of cows.
Cow-calf producers had plenty of time to bring cattle from summer pastures, to shelter around farmsteads and to fenced corn stubble fields for late grazing prior to winter. Northeast South Dakota farmer Wally Knock said he has plenty of feed despite a dry late summer.
Multiple colleges in North Dakota and Minnesota are starting up meat cutting programs to try to help meet a demand for workers. Some of the first North Dakota State College of Science students are interning with a small-town meat locker as part of that program.

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