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Mayo Clinic podcast: What happens after a prostate cancer diagnosis?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. R. Jeffrey Karnes discusses treatment options for prostate cancer and the latest in clinical trials and research.

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After skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer in men. One in 8 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in his lifetime, according to the National Cancer Institute.

While some types of prostate cancer grow slowly, and may need minimal or even no treatment, other types are aggressive and can spread quickly.

So if you’ve been diagnosed with prostate cancer. Now what?

"It's very important to know the extent or stage of the cancer," says Dr. R. Jeffrey Karnes , a Mayo Clinic urologist and chair of the Division of Community Urology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Diagnosis and staging are done using tests, including ultrasound, MRI and biopsy.

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Prostate cancer that's detected early — when it's still confined to the prostate gland — has the best chance for successful treatment. Prostate cancer treatment options depend on several factors, such as how fast the cancer is growing, whether it has spread, as well as the potential benefits or side effects of the treatment.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Karnes discusses treatment options for prostate cancer and the latest in clinical trials and research.

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