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Health officials urge people to get vaccinated

With many of the new positive COVID-19 cases in younger age categories, CHI St. Joseph’s Health Community Health/Hubbard County Public Health continue their efforts to vaccinate community members.

Coronavirus local headlines graphic

“It is imperative we make a collective effort to protect each other and do our part to stop this pandemic,” they said in a news release Wednesday.

“With the recent increase in COVID-19 cases in Hubbard County, we encourage the community to take advantage of vaccination opportunities, whether through Community Health or through their own health care provider.”

COVID-19 vaccine is readily available in the community and anyone wanting to schedule a vaccination is encouraged to contact CHI St. Joseph’s Health Community Health at 218-237-5464.

There is no charge for a COVID-19 vaccine through CHI St. Joseph’s Health Community Health.

The news release also urged the public to continue taking precautions such as wearing masks, staying home when sick, washing hands, and avoiding large gatherings.

Related Topics: HEALTH NEWSCOVID-19 VACCINE
Lorie Skarpness has lived in the Park Rapids area since 1997 and has been writing for the Park Rapids Enterprise since 2017. She enjoys writing features about the people and wildlife who call the north woods home.
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