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Health Fusion: Yoga and deep breathing for kids with ADHD

Could a downward-facing dog yoga pose help kids with ADHD? In this episode of the NewsMD podcast, "Health Fusion," Viv Williams looks at a study that shows yoga and deep breathing do make a difference.

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During the COVID-19 lockdown, I got into yoga. Practicing poses and deep breathing helped improve my strength and flexibility. They also reduced my stress level and kept me feeling centered. A new study shows that yoga and deep breathing also help kids with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) .

Researchers at Ural Federal University put together special sessions of yoga and deep breathing for kids ages 6 and 7. The children participated three times a week for two to three months. Results showed that after the sessions, attention improved and they could focus on tasks longer. The researchers say that deep breathing helped get more oxygen to their brains and the exercises helped the breathing to become automatic.

The researchers say the positive response was immediate and lasted up to a year.

Follow the Health Fusion podcast on Apple , Spotify , and Google Podcasts.

For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at vwilliams@newsmd.com . Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

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