SUBSCRIBE NOW AND SAVE 3 months just 99¢/month

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Health Fusion: 3 tips for planting blueberry bushes

Research shows that if you grow some of your own fruits and vegetables, you're likely to eat more of them. In this episode of NewsMD's podcast, "Health Fusion," Viv Williams has three tips to help you grow your own blueberries.

Blueberries are one of my favorite fruits. The Blueberry Council website shows a cup is only 80 calories, low sodium, with manganese and vitamins C and K. Plus, they are full of fiber. Here are three tips to help you grow your own blueberry bushes:

  • Choose blueberry bushes that are hardy for where you live. Some varieties are specifically designed for colder climates.
  • Blueberry bushes need acidic soil. The ph should be between 4 and 5. You can lower soil ph by amending with sulphur, but that takes time. A quicker fix is to use sphagnum peat.
  • Blueberry bushes need a lot of sun

Talk to your local garden center about growing blueberries where you live.
Follow the Health Fusion podcast on Apple , Spotify , and Google Podcasts.

For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at vwilliams@newsmd.com . Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

ADVERTISEMENT

Health-Fusion-logo.jpg

What to read next
Throughout the pandemic, rural health care facilities have been overwhelmed, and an already strained workforce is partly to blame. According to Brad Gibbens, acting director of the Center for Rural Health at UND, workforce is the most important policy issue in rural health, especially nearly two years into the COVID-19 pandemic.
If you vape and test positive for COVID, you're more likely to get symptoms than people who don't light up. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams talks to a Mayo Clinic expert who studied COVID's impact on people who use e-cigarettes.
Canadian researchers recently reported how a Halifax pandemic response to a shelter outbreak provided "safe supply" of substances to persons experiencing homelessness. The effort saw few adverse events, high rates of adherence during 14-day seclusion in hotels.
The seven-day rolling average positive test rate remained at 23.7% on Friday.