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Racin' bacon: Nevis rolls out pink carpet for pig racing fans

On your oink, get swine, wheeeeee! Nevis' running of the pigs attracted an estimated 1,800 spectators Sunday afternoon, according to organizer Dave McCurnin. A bit of early morning rain didn't dampen the piggy high jinx. "It's a pretty special ev...

On your oink, get swine, wheeeeee!

Nevis' running of the pigs attracted an estimated 1,800 spectators Sunday afternoon, according to organizer Dave McCurnin.

A bit of early morning rain didn't dampen the piggy high jinx.

"It's a pretty special event," McCurnin told the packed bleachers.

A couple from Norway traveled the furthest to see the sport of pig racing.

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Gary Dauer once again served as ringmaster - or more accurately, pigmeister - for the day. He ventured from Leader for the International Pig Racing Federation-sanctioned event.

The 2017 Nevis Pig Race went whole hog to settle the political scandal surrounding Russia and President Donald Trump, bypassing congressional investigations.

"Then Congress, instead of messing with that, can do things like balance the budget, things you voted them there to go do. Maybe reduce spending," McCurnin said.

Trump's wily pig, wearing the traditional hair piece, went rogue, jumping the gun and scurrying down the race track until shooed back to the starting gate by Dauer. A swine swindler? Or an overeager honest hog?

Clad in a muscle shirt, Putin's pig appeared stoic. The beefy porker handily won the race.

"Alright, it's solved," said McCurnin. "Now Congress can go to work."

Later, he reported that, upon learning the race results, "Trump quickly 'twitted' the Nevis Pig Races as "Fake news. Very, very fake news."

Pretty in pink, Nevis Study Club members sold pig-shaped sugar cookies for $1.

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"They really need the powdered sugar frosting because they are mostly butter," confessed Kate Larson, a club member.

Proceeds stay in the Nevis area, often used to beautify the city with blooming flowers planted by the club.

The Nevis Lions Club sold out of sloppy joes and hot dogs. Andy Lindow reportedly sold out of pork chops, which may have been last year's losers, quipped McCurnin.

Shannon Geisen is editor of the Park Rapids Enterprise.
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