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Park Rapids Library enters phase 3 of reopening

Three computers will be available to the public on a limited basis.

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Enterprise file photo

The Park Rapids Library plans to move into Phase 3 beginning Monday, July 6.

Phase 3 will include its current contactless services, along with time and space limits for public use.

According to a news release, the library will continue operating on an adjusted schedule. Limited public service and contactless curbside pickup is Monday through Friday from 10 a.,m. to noon and 2-4 p.m. Staff will be available to answer phone calls Monday through Friday between 9:30 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Staff will be wearing face masks in consideration of the health and safety of our patrons and ourselves. We encourage patrons to do the same.

Upon entering the building, patrons must use hand sanitizer (provided by the library) and follow social distancing guidelines. Anyone failing to do so will be asked to leave.

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There will be three computers available to the public, two by appointment, one on a first-come-first-served basis from 10:30 a.m. to noon and from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Appointments will be limited to 20 minutes. Keyboards and work surfaces will be disinfected between patron appointments. A patron will be allowed no more than two 20-minute computer sessions per day. Patrons must leave the library between sessions while staff disinfects work space.

Microfilm reader will be available by appointment on the same schedule and with the same time restrictions as computer use.

Copying and faxing will be available by appointment from 10 a.m. to noon and 2-4 p.m.

Surfaces in restrooms will be disinfected after use, and at regularly scheduled intervals.

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