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Much-photographed rock stack in Minnesota state park collapses in storm

The stack of rocks is a remnant from a well-known arch formation that partially collapsed in 2010.

Tettegouche arch
The remnants of the sea arch in Tettegouche State Park in 2010. The pillar of rocks that once made up part of the arch collapsed into Lake Superior during the weekend's winter storm. (Minnesota DNR photo)

SILVER BAY, Minn. — Visitors to Tettegouche State Park on Sunday, Dec. 1, are reporting on social media that a much-photographed stack of rocks rising from Lake Superior just offshore has collapsed in the wake of the weekend's winter storm.

George Ilstrup of Duluth posted a picture of the rocks Saturday on his Instagram account. A day later, he posted again to say the rocks were gone.

"RIP to the Tettegouche sea stack from the picture I just posted," he wrote Sunday. "It broke off in the storm last night!"

The stack of rocks is a remnant from a well-known arch formation that partially collapsed in 2010 . The arch was carved out from thousands of years of Lake Superior's waves.

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before
The arch at Tettegouche State Park still held in June. (Amy Funk, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources)

Tettegouche State Park is along the North Shore near Illgen City, about 30 miles east of Two Harbors.

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