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UPDATE: Murder-suicide claims lives of Wadena spouses

The Otter Tail County Sheriff's Office has determined the husband shot and killed his wife before taking his own life.

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WADENA — Authorities have determined that 25-year-old Isaac Malone shot and killed his wife, Ariel, before taking his own life Friday, April 29, in rural Wadena, in Otter Tail County.
The Otter Tail County Sheriff's Office responded to the home of Isaac and Ariel (Sakry) Malone at about 8:40 p.m. on Friday night where they found the husband and wife dead. At the time it was reported as an isolated incident but suspicious.
Monday morning, the sheriff's office reported that they determined the husband murdered his 25-year-old wife before taking his own life. No further information was available about what provoked the incident.
Autopsies were completed by the Midwest Medical Examiners Officer. Minnesota BCA is assisting with the investigation.
Funerals have been planned for the two, Isaac in Wadena, and Ariel in her hometown of Clarkfield, Minn.
The couple leave behind two children age 3 and 1.
No further information has been released at this time as the sheriff's office said the incident remains under investigation.

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