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Letters: Travel 'bogged' by poor maintenance

Travel 'bogged' by poor maintenance We retired in 2004 and had a home built in Osage on Bog Lake Trail, which is north on Co. Rd. 48 from Highway 34. Bog Lake Trail is a "dead-end" road and is about a mile long, ending at Straight Lake. We have f...

Travel 'bogged' by poor maintenance

We retired in 2004 and had a home built in Osage on Bog Lake Trail, which is north on Co. Rd. 48 from Highway 34.

Bog Lake Trail is a "dead-end" road and is about a mile long, ending at Straight Lake. We have five acres of wooded land and we are delighted with the beauty of the area, a truly idyllic scene.

However, my wife and I have one complaint, which we feel is a serious one. Bog Lake Trail is the worst road we have ever driven on. This road is so poorly maintained by Osage Township that driving from our home to the highway is a daily bad adventure.

There are deep ruts in the road at certain points that get deeper after each rainfall. As of the date of this letter, there has been no mail delivery since last Saturday due to the weekend snowstorm.

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After calling a member of the Osage Township Board, the snow plow came through yesterday, but left the road still in such bad shape that we got stuck this morning trying to drive out to the main road. We do not own a 4x4 and our passenger car is not built to travel on this obstacle course.

We pay property taxes and we assume that out of these taxes, maintenance of Bog Lake Trail Road should be covered, along with the property taxes of the other homeowners living on this road.

We expect this road to be properly maintained. Perhaps we expect too much.

Bart Jones

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