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Letters: Thanks to all who helped

The Park Rapids League of Women Voters would like to thank the Park Rapids Enterprise for helping us to invite the entire community to some recent events. Many people read The Appeal and over 30 gathered to discuss it. Nearly 40 came to listen to...

The Park Rapids League of Women Voters would like to thank the Park Rapids Enterprise for helping us to invite the entire community to some recent events. Many people read The Appeal and over 30 gathered to discuss it. Nearly 40 came to listen to the Round Table discussion on "Promoting an Impartial Judiciary."

The League was formed in 1923 to assure that citizens could be well-informed voters. That work continues as the League encourages active participation in government and influences public policy through education and advocacy. Men have been welcomed as full members of the League since 1974.

Special thanks also goes to those who attended the programs, including Mary Adams for guiding the book discussion, and Judge John Smith and Attorneys David Stowman, Evon Spangler and Janel Wallace for participating in the Round Table discussion. The League also thanks the Park Rapids Area Library, co-sponsors of the Community Read, and the Hubbard County Bar Association for monetary support for the Round Table.

Watch for more information about the League's upcoming Candidate Forums, Oct. 7 in Laporte, Oct. 23 at the Park Rapid Area High School, and Oct. 27 in Park Rapids.

The League meets again Tuesday, Oct. 21 at the Park Rapids Library. At 5 p.m. the public is invited to attend an informational program with the Minnesota League's Co-Presidents. Hearty refreshments are served. Following the program, at 6 p.m., the League holds its regular membership meeting. For more information contact co-presidents Annamae Holzworth, 564-4613 or Cindy Gunsolus, 732-6593.

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Florence Hedeen

Park Rapids League of Minnesota Voters

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