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Girtz opens implement, tire business

Steve Girtz has purchased the Park Rapids Sale Barn inventory from Chuck and Roberta Malm, opening Girtz Implement and Tire at 13700 190th St., just northwest of the school windmill.

Steve Girtz has purchased the Park Rapids Sale Barn inventory from Chuck and Roberta Malm, opening Girtz Implement and Tire at 13700 190th St., just northwest of the school windmill.

The Girtz inventory includes three-point equipment for tractors for use in developing deer plots and tree farms. Discs, diggers, plows, brush cutters, tillers, back blades and yard rakes are available.

Bobcat attachments are also on hand, including buckets, rock buckets, bale spears and pallet forks. If the attachment's not on hand, Girtz will order it.

Tires for tractors and implements are also sold.

Girtz deals in new and some consigned items.

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He brings a broad range of experience to his business, having worked at John's Body Shop, as a logger and as a mechanic for John Deere.

His learning is based "on trial and error," he said.

The implements and tires are his primary focus, but when customers arrive, they witness his restorative talents. A garage full of vintage tractors, looking just like new, stirs memories of yore.

In the last three-plus years, Girtz has renovated 45 tractors, 10 since May.

Interest in tractors of bygone years is growing, he said, and traditional body shops don't work on them.

"They send people my way," he said of the affable farmers who hold a fondness for the machines responsible for their livelihood.

He and wife Janelle each have restored tractors once belonging to their respective grandfathers.

Janelle's, a red International, stands out among the dozen Deere tractors, however. Both have been heading to tractor pulls during the last decade.

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Girtz Implement and Tire is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday. "Or give us a call; we're normally around."

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