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Einar Carl Carlson

Einar Carl Carlson, 95, of Park Rapids, formerly of the Akeley-Nevis area, died Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2008 at Hyatt House Assisted Living in Park Rapids.

Einar Carl Carlson, 95, of Park Rapids, formerly of the Akeley-Nevis area, died Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2008 at Hyatt House Assisted Living in Park Rapids.

He was born June 28, 1913 in East St. Paul to Leo and Julia Carlson. He attended Erickson Public School. He gained employment working for the Northern Malleable Iron Foundry in East St. Paul.

On June 26, 1936 he married Claire Hanson in Hinckley. They had two daughters.

In 1944, the couple moved to Hinckley, where he worked as an electrician's assistant and as a cemetery caretaker. In 1947, they moved to Torrance, Calif. where he worked for the Harvey Aluminum Co. They later moved to Galesburg, Ill. where he worked for Burlington-Northern Railroad. In 1951, they returned to St. Paul where he resumed his career with the iron foundry.

On May 13, 1961, he married Ruth Sophia Clauson at the Little Brown Church in the Vale in Nashwauk, Iowa. They lived in St. Paul for many years. In 1961, they began working maintenance at the Ravoux High Rise Apartments. In the early 1970s they retired to the Akeley-Nevis area where they helped establish the Bible Baptist Church in Nevis as charter members.

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He is survived by two daughters: Sharon and Cleone, both of Park Rapids; seven grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; three great-great-grandchildren; two stepsons: Martin and Dennis Treon; and three stepgrandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his wife, Ruth, in 2004; and his brother, George.

Funeral service: 2 p.m. today (Wednesday), Oct. 22 at Jones-Pearson Funeral Home in Park Rapids, with Rev. Tom Drury officiating.

Interment: Greenwood Cemetery, Park Rapids.

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