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Cyclists enjoy beautiful day at Headwaters 100

The 28th annual Headwaters 100 took cyclists on a ride through a landscape of leaves changing color on a perfect fall day Saturday. "Beautiful day, beautiful course," said Fred Storti, of Afton. "It was great." Storti, 61, participated in the 100...

The 28th annual Headwaters 100 took cyclists on a ride through a landscape of leaves changing color on a perfect fall day Saturday.

"Beautiful day, beautiful course," said Fred Storti, of Afton. "It was great."

Storti, 61, participated in the 100-mile road race. It was his first time participating in this particular race but he had ridden in the Headwaters 100-mile ride, which isn't a competition, previously.

He wanted to win his age group, which he accomplished.

"I wanted to finish with the lead group, which I did," Storti said.

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His time was 4:04:07.4.

The overall winner was Matt Muyres of Minneapolis, with a time of 4:00:24.1.

Complete results are available online at www.itiming.com .

The Headwaters 100 isn't just about racing, though. Some cyclists participated in 100-, 75- and 45-mile courses at a more casual pace.

Bill Grundy of Bemidji participated in the 45-mile ride for the fourth time.

"It's really pretty this time of year and the food stops are great," he said. "It's fun to ride with other people."

The 45-mile race had stops near Emmaville and Nevis. The 75- and 100-mile rides lead cyclists through more of the area, including Itasca State Park and the Headwaters of the Mississippi.

This year's event had 669 people registered with only 34 no shows, said Ken Grob, a member of Itascatur Ski-Bike-Run Club, that sponsored the event.

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"It's one of our best years," Grob said Saturday.

Cyclists come to the Park Rapids area from all over, including Canada, Colorado, Iowa, Indiana, North Dakota, Nebraska, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Wisconsin and Minnesota.

Money earned from the event goes toward maintaining cross-country ski trails.

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