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Cody’s Corner: One great dog; hundreds that need help

By Sarah Smithssmith@parkrapidsenterprise.com This week we have two stories in Cody's Corner, one good and one not so good. First the good: this comes from Bobbi Jacobson, a local resident. "From as far back as I can remember I've loved dogs. I'v...

Thomas and Frankie
Thomas with Frankie and the 4-H ribbons he won with the dog. (Submitted photo)

By Sarah Smithssmith@parkrapidsenterprise.com This week we have two stories in Cody’s Corner, one good and one not so good. First the good: this comes from Bobbi Jacobson, a local resident. “From as far back as I can remember I’ve loved dogs.  I’ve had many through the years, including the ones I’d dog sit for relatives and friends when they would go out of town. “Finally, on my 12th birthday, Mom and Dad must have been convinced that I was incurable and bought me my own puppy, a German Shepard I named Sandy.  Other than me going to school during the day and church on Sunday’s we were inseparable. St. Paul Dog Training Club held weekly classes in the summer, just a few blocks from my house in the big pavilion on Como Lake. “My friend and I would walk our dogs over to attend obedience classes and little fun shows and in the winter our parents would drive us to their winter indoor location a few miles away.  I believe that club is still in existence.  Great memories!   “But even greater is what’s happening in my canine world now.  Two years ago I purchased a German Shorthair puppy.  It’s so amazing watching a pointer do her thing whether it is walking a trail in the woods or out in a field hunting up pheasants. “My grandson Thomas fell in love with her also and the bond between them is unbelievable. “As a 4-H member he showed an interest in the dog obedience and rally training projects. “4-H is an excellent learning organization for young kids, and Frankie, our dog was more than willing to make the weekly training sessions every week this past summer with him. “There were a few head shaking moments the first few lessons on either the dogs (really?) moments, or her trainers, but they finally clicked and made great progress.  They had a lot of fun at the county fair and did exceptionally well for their first year and went on to the state show. Frankie’s a wonderful dog and companion, but to see her team up with my grandson makes my heart happy beyond words.” n
And the not so good. Nevis resident Sue Fiste will be traveling to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation this weekend to help rescue stray dogs. There are 1,000 at last count. Sue, her daughter Angel and Emily Greer will be driving to the South Dakota reservation to bring back as many as possible. Tribal elders began rounding up dogs and shooting them last fall, when an 8-year-old girl died of traumatic injuries. Fiste said they jumped to the conclusion that a pack of wild dogs attacked the girl and began systematically rounding up dogs and horses, taking them to the landfill and shooting them. Fiste was horrified. Some dogs had mange and fleas. Many were not vaccinated so they were spreading diseases throughout the poorest reservation in the country, and some were healthy and simply needed good homes. Viste said rescuers need blankets or towels to wrap the dogs in, dog food (and cat food since cats are strays, too) and funds. Each trip costs $700. Fiste can be reached at 218-252-1561 if you are interested in helping the rescue efforts. There is also a website: www.petcaring.com/animal-rescue/help-us-transport-the-pine-ridge-dogs. If you have a pet story, or issue, or even a question, email ssmith@parkrapidsenterprise.com.By Sarah Smithssmith@parkrapidsenterprise.comThis week we have two stories in Cody’s Corner, one good and one not so good.First the good: this comes from Bobbi Jacobson, a local resident.“From as far back as I can remember I’ve loved dogs.  I’ve had many through the years, including the ones I’d dog sit for relatives and friends when they would go out of town.“Finally, on my 12th birthday, Mom and Dad must have been convinced that I was incurable and bought me my own puppy, a German Shepard I named Sandy.  Other than me going to school during the day and church on Sunday’s we were inseparable.St. Paul Dog Training Club held weekly classes in the summer, just a few blocks from my house in the big pavilion on Como Lake.“My friend and I would walk our dogs over to attend obedience classes and little fun shows and in the winter our parents would drive us to their winter indoor location a few miles away.  I believe that club is still in existence.  Great memories!  “But even greater is what’s happening in my canine world now.  Two years ago I purchased a German Shorthair puppy.  It’s so amazing watching a pointer do her thing whether it is walking a trail in the woods or out in a field hunting up pheasants.“My grandson Thomas fell in love with her also and the bond between them is unbelievable.“As a 4-H member he showed an interest in the dog obedience and rally training projects.“4-H is an excellent learning organization for young kids, and Frankie, our dog was more than willing to make the weekly training sessions every week this past summer with him.“There were a few head shaking moments the first few lessons on either the dogs (really?) moments, or her trainers, but they finally clicked and made great progress.  They had a lot of fun at the county fair and did exceptionally well for their first year and went on to the state show.Frankie’s a wonderful dog and companion, but to see her team up with my grandson makes my heart happy beyond words.”n
And the not so good.Nevis resident Sue Fiste will be traveling to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation this weekend to help rescue stray dogs.There are 1,000 at last count. Sue, her daughter Angel and Emily Greer will be driving to the South Dakota reservation to bring back as many as possible.Tribal elders began rounding up dogs and shooting them last fall, when an 8-year-old girl died of traumatic injuries.Fiste said they jumped to the conclusion that a pack of wild dogs attacked the girl and began systematically rounding up dogs and horses, taking them to the landfill and shooting them.Fiste was horrified. Some dogs had mange and fleas. Many were not vaccinated so they were spreading diseases throughout the poorest reservation in the country, and some were healthy and simply needed good homes.Viste said rescuers need blankets or towels to wrap the dogs in, dog food (and cat food since cats are strays, too) and funds. Each trip costs $700.Fiste can be reached at 218-252-1561 if you are interested in helping the rescue efforts.There is also a website: www.petcaring.com/animal-rescue/help-us-transport-the-pine-ridge-dogs.If you have a pet story, or issue, or even a question, email ssmith@parkrapidsenterprise.com.

Related Topics: PETS
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