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Century Middle School honors veterans

A middle-school presentation about the U.S. Army's most decorated medic was a highlight of the Veterans Day honors Monday at Century School. Born in 1911 in Sherburne County and buried in 1953 in Park Rapids, Lloyd Cortez Hawks was the first medi...

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Eighth graders Isaac Zinniel (from left) and Matt Lichter listen to seventh grader Lucas Bittmann recite his lines during the Veterans Day wax museum Monday at Park Rapids Century School. Each seventh grader told the story of a past or present member of the U.S. uniformed services. Bittmann represented his father, James Bittmann, who served in the Air Force. (Photos by Robin Fish/Enterprise)

A middle-school presentation about the U.S. Army's most decorated medic was a highlight of the Veterans Day honors Monday at Century School.

Born in 1911 in Sherburne County and buried in 1953 in Park Rapids, Lloyd Cortez Hawks was the first medic in the military to receive the Medal of Honor.

Students Nadia Yliniemi and Levi Trygstad described Hawks' heroism in World War II and Korea, including one incident in which he continued treating a fallen soldier and dragged him to safety after having his own hip and arm shattered by machine gun fire.

Earlier, Century seventh graders lined up in the school's main hallway, dressed in heirloom military uniforms, and acted as living wax figures honoring servicemen and -women of the past and present. Teachers, students, family members and people from the community paused to listen to them recite their chosen veterans' stories.

Following the tribute to Hawks, middle school students honored all branches of the U.S. military and performed a solemn flag-folding ritual. Trumpeter Daniel Neubauer played "Taps."

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The Park Rapids American Legion Color Guard posted the colors. The program ended with Lee Greenwood's song "God Bless the U.S.A."

Related Topics: VETERANS
Robin Fish is a staff reporter at the Park Rapids Enterprise. Contact him at rfish@parkrapidsenterprise.com or 218-252-3053.
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