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NORTHWOODS COOKS: Enjoy fresh picked corn

Readers are invited to submit their favorite recipes to enjoy, along with a note about what makes them special. Send recipes to lskarpness@parkrapidsenterprise.com.

corn on the cob wrapped in bacon
Add a little sizzle to corn on the cob by wrapping it in bacon. Whether made in the oven or on the grill, it is sure to be a hit at the dinner table.
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Nothing says summer like the taste of corn fresh from a Minnesota field.

These recipes, from a selection of 30 favorites at thepioneerwoman.com, showcase some ways to enjoy the corn while it’s in season.

Best Bacon Wrapped Corn

1/4 cup honey

1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper

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6 ears of corn, shucked and halved

1/4 cup vegetable oil

1-1/2 tsp. kosher salt

Black pepper, to taste

12 slices of bacon

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Combine the honey and cayenne in a small bowl and set aside.

Toss the corn in a large bowl with the vegetable oil, salt and black pepper. Wrap each piece of corn with a slice of bacon, starting at one end and spiraling around the cob, overlapping the bacon slightly. Tuck the end of the bacon under itself to secure it.

Place the corn seam-side down on the prepared baking sheet. Brush the bacon with the spicy honey. Roast, turning the corn over halfway through, until the corn is tender and the bacon is browned and crispy, about 25 minutes.

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Rigatoni with Creamy Corn

1 tsp. kosher salt, plus more for the pasta water

6 ears of corn, shucked

1/2 cup heavy cream

3 Tbsp. salted butter, cut into pieces

Pinch of red pepper flakes

1 lb. mezzi rigatoni (or other short pasta)

3/4 cup grated parmesan cheese

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1/4 cup chopped fresh chives

1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Find a large heatproof bowl that will fit over the pasta pot like a double boiler. Slice the kernels off the cobs and put the kernels in the bowl. With the dull side of the knife (or with a butter knife), scrape each cob over the bowl to remove all the bits of kernel and creamy milk.

Add the heavy cream, butter, red pepper flakes and 1/2 teaspoon salt to the bowl. Add the pasta to the boiling water and set the bowl with the corn mixture over the pasta pot.

Let the corn mixture warm, stirring occasionally, until the butter is melted and the pasta underneath is al dente, 10 to 12 minutes. Remove the bowl of corn. Reserve 1/2 cup of the pasta cooking water, then drain the pasta.

Add the hot pasta to the corn mixture. Sprinkle with the parmesan, chives and parsley and toss well, adding the reserved cooking water a little at a time if the pasta seems dry. Season with the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt.

Fresh Corn Casserole

8 ears corn, still in the husk

2/3 cup heavy cream

3 Tbsp. butter (salted)

1/2 tsp. salt, to taste

Ground pepper, to taste

Remove the corn from the husks. In a large, deep bowl, slice off the kernels of corn. With the dull side of the knife (or a regular dinner knife), press and scrape the cob all the way down to remove all the bits of kernel and creamy milk inside.

Add heavy cream, salt to taste, a generous amount of ground pepper and butter; mix well. Pour mixture into a baking dish. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 to 45 minutes or until thoroughly warmed through.

Readers are invited to submit their favorite recipes to enjoy, along with a note about what makes them special. Send recipes to lskarpness@parkrapidsenterprise.com.

Readers are invited to submit their favorite recipes to enjoy, along with a note about what makes them special. Send recipes to lskarpness@parkrapidsenterprise.com.

Related Topics: NORTHWOODS COOKSFOODRECIPES
Lorie Skarpness has lived in the Park Rapids area since 1997 and has been writing for the Park Rapids Enterprise since 2017. She enjoys writing features about the people and wildlife who call the north woods home.
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