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Park Rapids artist completes Hogwarts-inspired mural

Tori Campbell, a senior at Park Rapids Area High School, has labored on her Hogwarts-themed mural for three trimesters. (Photos by Shannon Geisen/Enterprise)1 / 2
Art is among Tori's many hobbies. She's in Mike Hartung's advanced art class. Last summer, she completed a mural for the Hubbard County Food Shelf.2 / 2

Tori Campbell put the finishing touches on her 10-foot-by-22-foot mural at the Park Rapids Area High School this week.

It's been a labor of love.

"For some reason, I wanted to do something much more difficult, and here we are," said the PRAHS senior.

Campbell has been working on the Harry Potter-themed mural for one to two hours daily for the three trimesters.

The design was inspired by a photo she found on the internet. It depicts Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry boats transporting first-year students across Black Lake to the castle at the start of the school year.

She sketched the photo onto paper and graphed it out.

"Under the 10 layers of paint that are on the wall, there is a grid," Campbell said.

She penciled the design by hand onto the wall.

"That alone took me a month," Campbell said.

The painting process proved troublesome when she discovered the original wall color bled through, altering the intended paint colors.

"So I had to keep changing the paint color because I didn't like it. It has taken me many layers," she said. "I've gone through very many of those bottles of paint."

Paint and brushes were supplied by Mike Hartung's art department. Campbell purchased stencils for the project.

Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus — the motto of Hogwarts School — runs along the mural's border.

"It's Latin for 'Never tickle a sleeping dragon,' which is good advice. I don't know when I'll ever need it...," Campbell said.

Hartung hopes the mural can be entered into the annual visual arts competition this spring.

Over the years, students have painted murals throughout the high school, Hartung said, "but this is the most intricate, time-consuming."

"I have such a great sense of accomplishment," Campbell said. "Even the satisfaction of knowing there will be a day when no one here knows who I am, but students can say, 'Wow, that's amazing. If that person can do that, I can do this.'"

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