Sections

Weather Forecast

Close

Quilting facts and ‘fabric’-ation

Historian Vickie Wendel discussed the folklore and history of American quilting to a large audience Monday at the Park Rapids Library. (Shannon Geisen / Enterprise)

Historian Vickie Wendel discussed the folklore and history of American quilting to a large audience Monday at the Park Rapids Library. (For instance, women of the 1800s did not mostly quilt on long, winter evenings. It was too dark to thread a needle. They usually sat on a front porch or by a sunny, bright window on afternoons. Nor did they quilt on wagons or around campfires as they moved westward in the mid-1800s.) Wendel shared quilt samples and slides of period pieces.  In addition to providing warmth, quilts have been raffled as fundraisers, served as memory keepers and made social or political statements. Above, Wendel holds a quilt from the Temperance movement, dedicated to promoting abstinenance in drinking alcoholic beverages. Familiar quilt patterns and names – such as, log cabin, basket block, nine patch, Jacob’s ladder – weren’t standardized until the 1930s, following the publication of Carrie Hall’s book, “The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt in America.”

Advertisement