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Editorial: Get ready for a ton of political advertising soon

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opinion Park Rapids, 56470
Park Rapids Minnesota PO Box 111 56470

Now that the primary election is over, the field is set for the Nov. 2 general election, and what a roller coaster that will be!

The Democrats spent $9 million to sort three candidates down to one, and the winner comes with money.

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Former U.S. Sen. Mark Dayton, of the department store family, spent nearly $3 million of his own money outlast House Speaker Margaret Anderson Kelliher, who spent about $1 million. Former House Minority Leader Matt Entenza came in third, but spent more than $5 million of his own family's wealth.

While Dayton and Kelliher waited for the last vote to be counted, they and Entenza finally closed circles late Wednesday afternoon and proclaimed Democratic unity going into the race with Republican state Rep. Tom Emmer, the GOP's choice for governor.

There is no doubt that with Dayton's ability to spend, and his penchant to go after the wealthy, plenty of TV ads will be seen between now and November.

Emmer isn't of family wealth, but he has the backing of the Minnesota Republican Party which today already launches a negative ad against Dayton, even though the new campaign has just started.

The problem this year will be the January Supreme Court decision which allows independent expenditures by unions and corporations. What the candidate's can't afford, somebody will pay for it.

No doubt unions will continue their bash-Emmer ads about his tip credit woes. And the Republicans and business groups will bash Dayton over his lack of greatness in the U.S. Senate. The ad today quotes himself as grading himself with an "F" for his time in the Senate.

If the voters got tired of negative ads that started in May, it's not over yet. We hope that by the time the election is held, there will be a hue and cry among the public for campaign contribution controls as well as spending limits that can withhold constitutional tests.

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